Technology Inceptions: Powerful Robots Helps in Faster Detection of Bridge Defects  |  Teacher Insights: Are you susceptible to persuasion?   |  Science Innovations: Mushrooms to help fight TB  |  Management lessons: How to Create Cool Brands and Stay Cool  |  Health Monitor: Honey Helps Increase Testosterone Levels in Males  |  Parent Interventions: Women Oncologists Skip Scientific Conference to Take Care of Children  |  Career News: Chinmaya University-CPPR Announce MA in Public Policy and Governance Course  |  Parent Interventions: Electrical zap to retrieve memory  |  Science Innovations: Laura Kreidberg: Trying to Spot the First Sign of Life Outside Earth  |  Parent Interventions: Don't Let Children Drink Too Much Juice, Sugar Water With Little Nutrients  |  Technology Inceptions: Low-Cost Tissue Freezing Device to Help In Breast Cancer Treatment  |  Science Innovations: Exomoons May Become Quasi-planets  |  Science Innovations: Blue Tongue Lizard Babies As Clever as Adults  |  Parent Interventions: Quality Sleep for Teen Health   |  Technology Inceptions: MIT Develops Artificial 'Muscles' Based on Fibers  |  
  • Pallikkutam Magazine
  • Companion Magazine
  • Mentor
  • Smart Board
  • Pallikkutam Publications

May 06, 2019 Monday 10:12:10 AM IST

Mind melding for social cues

Parent Interventions

Parents may often feel like they are not ‘on the same wavelength’ as their kids. But it turns out that, at least for babies, their brainwaves literally sync with their moms when they are learning from them about their social environment. A new study presented by the Cognitive Neuroscience Society (CNS) in San Francisco recently found that how well babies' neural activity syncs with their moms' predicts how well they learn social cues. "When we connect neurally with our children we are opening ourselves to receiving information and influence from them,” according to the researchers. Researchers found that stronger neural synchrony between mother and child predicted a higher likelihood of social learning by the child. Neural synchrony happens when brainwaves from two people follow predictable patterns with respect to each other. When parents or children fail to synchronize with each other, which may occur in certain mental health difficulties and developmental disorders, the learning and development is affected in the longer term.

Comments