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December 06, 2019 Friday 01:57:58 PM IST

Mental Health Literacy Prevents Suicide in Teens

Parent Interventions

Mental health training programs for teenagers can help reduce the incidence of suicides according to a study done by researchers at University of Melbourne. It was observed that students who underwent teen Mental Health First Aid (tMHFA) were 35 times more likely to report adequate suicide first aid than those who didn't get such training. Results suggested that student knowledge of the general warning signs of mental health problems and confidence to offer support was more important than having specific knowledge of suicide - calling into question suicide specific education programs in schools. The results were based on survey data of 800 students who had participated in the 3 x75 minute class-room based programme. University of Melbourne Senior Research Fellow Laura Hart said the findings demonstrate the importance of embedding suicide-prevention information within general mental health programs in schools and increasing peer support and discussion opportunities.

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