Parent Interventions: A Healthy Breakfast for Your Child  |  Leadership Instincts: IITH-NIMS Joint Research Centre to be Set up in Japan  |  Teacher Insights: Disruptive Students Affect Teachers’ Well Being  |  Teacher Insights: Old and Young Perfect Friends  |  Science Innovations: Mango Round the Year  |  Science Innovations: Hand Held Device to Detect Dengue  |  Parent Interventions: Political Ad Campaigns Add to Anxiety  |  Policy Indications: Streamlining Compliance in Higher Education  |  Technology Inceptions: Canon Super Telephoto RF Prime L Lenses  |  Technology Inceptions: Boya BY-WM4 Pro Wireless Mic  |  Technology Inceptions: Microsoft Edge Kids Mode  |  Life Inspirations: In Search of Heaven  |  National Edu News: 71st RRT Conference International on Appropriate Pedagogy of the Digital Natives  |  Guest Column: Collaboration + Research = Global Solutions   |  Teacher Insights: How Digital Technology Helps in Growth and Access to Quality Education  |  
February 19, 2021 Friday 05:26:15 PM IST

Mediterranean diet linked to thinking skills

Parent Interventions

People who eat a Mediterranean-style diet—particularly one rich in green leafy vegetables and low in meat—are more likely to stay mentally sharp in later life, a study shows. Closely adhering to a Mediterranean diet was associated with higher scores on a range of memory and thinking tests among adults in their late 70s, the research found. The study found no link, however, between the Mediterranean-style diet and better brain health. Markers of healthy brain ageing – such as greater grey or white matter volume, or fewer white matter lesions—did not differ between those regularly eating a Mediterranean diet and those who did not.

These latest findings suggest that this primarily plant-based diet may have benefits for cognitive functioning as we get older, researchers say. Researchers at the University of Edinburgh tested the thinking skills of more than 500 people aged 79 and without dementia. The participants completed tests of problem solving, thinking speed, memory, and word knowledge, as well as a questionnaire about their eating habits during the previous year. More than 350 of the group also underwent a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) brain scan to gain insights into their brain structure. The team used statistical models to look for associations between a person’s diet and their thinking skills and brain health in later life.

The findings show that, in general, people who most closely adhered to a Mediterranean diet had the highest cognitive function scores, even when accounting for childhood IQ, smoking, physical activity, and health factors. The differences were small but statistically significant. The individual components of the diet that appeared to be most strongly associated with better thinking skills were green leafy vegetables and a lower red meat intake. Researchers say the latest findings add to the evidence that a healthier lifestyle, of which diet is one aspect, is associated with better thinking skills in later life.

Comments