Parent Interventions: As a Studious Girl Destroyed Her Mobile Phone  |  Teacher Insights: Know about how to choose the best MPPSC coaching institute  |  National Edu News: Swinburne University of Technology & IIT H launch the joint doctoral program  |  Policy Indications: India & Japan collaborations for innovations on Hydrogen based technologies  |  National Edu News: Education Minister addresses at the Annual Convocation of IIM Rohtak  |  Education Information: UPSC postpones tests and Interviews of some examinations  |  National Edu News: Piyush Goyal launches the Startup India Seed Fund Scheme  |  Teacher Insights: Are you Proficient in English?  |  National Edu News: National climate vulnerability assessment sees 8 states as highly vulnerable  |  National Edu News: Education minister e-launches long-lasting hygiene product DuroKea Series  |  National Edu News: Punjab’s new nutrient rich crop varieties can satisfy India's nutritional needs   |  Guest Column: Delicious Dhabas  |  International Edu News: 2D Perovskites for Solar Cells and LEDS  |  International Edu News: AI Model for Predicting Tsunami  |  International Edu News: Wearable Sweat Sensors on a Bandage  |  
March 02, 2021 Tuesday 05:10:48 PM IST

Making music tunes up wellbeing during lockdown

International Edu News

Spontaneous group music making is associated with a number of wellbeing benefits – even if the performers are not in the same room – a study shows. Online improvisation sessions by an international group of musicians enhanced mood, lowered levels of loneliness and promoted a feeling of community during the first Covid-19 lockdown, the research found. The study is the first to investigate the effects of global online music making during the pandemic. Researchers at Edinburgh College of Art examined the experiences of the Glasgow Improvisers Orchestra – a diverse group of players which includes musicians who have performed with the National Jazz Orchestra and The BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra.

The Orchestra began improvisation sessions as a way of staying connected during lockdown. Musicians from other parts of the world were also invited to the Zoom sessions. Researchers interviewed a sample of 29 musicians who took part in twice weekly music sessions from March 2020 to June 2020.

As well as boosting their mood and providing community, the musicians reported that the sessions gave them an opportunity for artistic development.  The findings also show that improvisation is well suited to digital music making as it facilitates creativity between musicians, the researchers say.

This is despite previous studies finding that latency issues – the time taken for sounds to travel via the internet from one location to another – can affect online music making where musicians are required play in sync.

Researchers say the results can help understand the benefits of online group music in providing emotional support – particularly for creative professionals who may have been adversely affected socially and economically by the pandemic. 

Comments