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March 23, 2020 Monday 09:57:41 AM IST

Making medicines and chemicals on demand

Technology Inceptions

A new method to produce medicines, chemicals and to be preserved in hydrogels have been developed by a team of US researchers. Hal Alper, Professor of Chemical Engineering who lead the team and Alshakim Nelson, Assistant Professor at University of Washington said that the new developments will lead to technologies for on-demand production of small-molecule and peptide products in the future. Hydrogel can be 3D printed or manually extruded. The approach could help people in remote villages or on military missions, where the absence of pharmacies, doctor’s offices or even basic refrigeration makes it hard to access critical medicines and other small-molecule compounds. (https://www.washington.edu/news/2020/02/04/hydrogel-platform-chemical-production/)

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