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March 16, 2020 Monday 11:33:43 AM IST

Making 3-D Printing Accurate

Technology Inceptions

Machine learning algorithms have been devised by USC Viterbi School of Engineering to tackle the problem of errors in 3-D printing. A software tool called PrintFixer was developed to improve 3-D printing accuracy by 50% or more thus making the process vastly more economical and sustainable. 3-D printing is considered the future of manufacturing as it enables engineers to directly build objects from computer-generated designs without outsourcing parts. Every 3-D printed object results in some slight deviation from the design, whether this is due to printed material expanding or contracting when printed, or due to the way the printer behaves. PrintFixer uses data gleaned from past 3-D printing jobs to train its AI to predict where the shape distortion will happen, in order to fix print errors before they occur.

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