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June 13, 2018 Wednesday 01:31:53 PM IST

Make Use of Visual Reminders

Parent Interventions

Australia: Scientists from The University of Queensland, Australia, recommends that parents should set up visual reminders to help children forgetful about their little tasks at home. These tasks shall be designed such that it shall support parents a little bit, but also allow children learn valuable lessons of life. If you find your children fails to regularly remember to accomplish their task, you shall rather remind them with visual cues. Their study reveals that setting up visual reminders is extremely helpful for children of nine years of age or less.

Scientists also found that it is highly unlikely that children on their own set up reminders, even as they regularly fail to remember their tasks. Hence, parents should be called to task to help children remember their own tasks. Even as children above and below nine years of age knew the likelihood that they may forget the tasks, only children above nine years bothered to set up reminders for themselves, which means children below nine needs to be helped with reminders set up by parents.

To the children belonging to below nine, there is no much use in telling them “not to forget”. They shall be rather assisted with visual reminders to remember their tasks. Adam Bulley, one of the co-authors of the study, suggests: “For example, placing a timetable of weekly household chores on a child’s bedroom door would alleviate their need to remember these actions by themselves. Leaving key items by the front door can also activate the memory to pack their school bag with the things they need for the day ahead”.

Parents are called upon to help children remember their little responsibilities in a smarter way, using visual reminders.


(Indebted to various sources)


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