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November 22, 2018 Thursday 04:44:04 PM IST

Magic mushrooms to boost creativity!

Leadership Instincts

In a preliminary study conducted by researchers of Leiden University in The Netherlands suggests that ‘microdoses’ of certain magic mushrooms may boost fluent thinking skills of humans.

The research led by Luisa Prochazkova experimentally investigated the cognitive-enhancing effects of microdosing on a person's brain function within a natural setting. The results are published in Psychopharmacology, the official journal of the European Behavioural Pharmacology Society (EBPS).

After taking the microdose of truffles, the researchers found that participants' convergent thinking abilities were improved. Participants also had more ideas about how to solve a presented task, and were more fluent, flexible and original in the possibilities they came up with. Microdosing with psychedelic substances therefore improved both the divergent and convergent thinking of participants.

"Taken together, our results suggest that consuming a microdose of truffles allowed participants to create more out-of-the-box alternative solutions for a problem, thus providing preliminary support for the assumption that microdosing improves divergent thinking," explains Prochazkova.


"Moreover, we also observed an improvement in convergent thinking, that is, increased performance on a task that requires the convergence on one single correct or best solution."

Source: DOI: 10.1007/s00213-018-5049-7


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