Policy Indications: Universities Can Set Benchmarks Above AICTE  |  National Edu News: New findings on conjectures used in number theory  |  Science Innovations: DST INSPIRE faculty on alternative anti-cancer therapy with transgenic zebrafish  |  Science Innovations: Scientists develop gold microstructure substrate with tunable wettability  |  National Edu News: POWERGRID signs agreement to improve telecom connectivity in hilly areas of HP  |  Education Information: MeitY to establish a Quantum Computing Applications Lab, Powered by AWS  |  Education Information: NITI Aayog to Launch Second Edition of India Innovation Index 2020  |  Policy Indications: A Dialogue on National Education Policy 2020 at Nehru Centre, London   |  Policy Indications: ‘75% marks in class 12’ eligibility criteria under JEE (Main) 21-22 waived off  |  Policy Indications: Syllabus of JEE and NEET to remain unchanged for the year 2021  |  Leadership Instincts: Millennials Better Lead Than Manage  |  Guest Column: Metro Rail Vs Automobile-The Economics of Premium Public Transport Pricing  |  International Edu News: What will education look like in future  |  Leadership Instincts: Advanced Leadership Initiative welcomes its most diverse group of fellows  |  International Edu News: Diet may influence risk of aggressive prostate cancer  |  
April 22, 2019 Monday 04:25:54 PM IST

Low earnings related to inattention at KG

Teacher Insights

A new longitudinal study examined boys from low-income backgrounds to determine which behaviours in kindergarten are associated with earnings in adulthood. The study concluded that inattention was associated with lower earnings and prosocial behaviour with higher earnings. 

The study by researchers at Carnegie Mellon University, revealed that inattention - characterized as poor concentration, distractibility, having one's head in the clouds, and lacking persistence - was associated with lower earnings when the students were 35 to 36 years old. In addition, prosocial behaviour was associated with higher earnings; examples of prosocial behaviour included trying to stop quarrels, inviting bystanders to join in a game, and trying to help someone who has been hurt.Identifying early childhood behavioural problems associated with economic success or failure is essential for developing targeted interventions that enhance economic prosperity through improved educational attainment and social integration. Both findings took into account children's IQ (assessed at age 13) and their families' adversity (parents' educational level and occupational status).


Comments