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April 05, 2018 Thursday 02:20:54 PM IST
Look Out for Germs with Unusual Antibiotic Resistance!

Germs with unusual antibiotic resistance are uncommon. A recent report by the U.S. CDC (Centers for Disease Control and prevention) states that such germs, which cannot be eliminated by the antibiotics, are found in the US.

"CDC's study found several dangerous pathogens, hiding in plain sight, that can cause infections that are difficult or impossible to treat," said CDC Principal Deputy Director Anne Schuchat, M.D. "It's reassuring to see that state and local experts, using our containment strategy, identified and stopped these resistant bacteria before they had the opportunity to spread."

Through the containment strategy, the CDC has rapidly identified the causative factors. They ran thorough infection control assessments, testing patients without symptoms who may carry and spread the germ, and continued infection control assessments until spread is stopped.

Further investigation in facilities with unusual resistance revealed that about one in 10 screening tests, from patients without symptoms, identified a hard-to-treat germ that spreads easily. This means the germ could have spread undetected in that health care facility.

The Center, along with the government, has given out detailed instruction to the public to avoid panic and to control the spread. 

(Source: www.cdc.gov)

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