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March 12, 2018 Monday 04:05:00 PM IST

Living in High Altitude may Increase Suicidal Tendency!

Science Innovations

There are chances for the people living in high altitude areas to have increased rates of suicide and depression, reveals a study. The possible reason is said to be the reduced oxygen level in their blood due to the lower atmospheric pressure.

Chronic hypobaric hypoxia, which is  a condition where the blood oxygen levels get reduced due to low atmospheric pressure, is said to be the causative factor. This  triggers mood swings and suicidal thoughts in a person living at altitudes between about 2,000 and 3,000 feet above the sea level.

Suicidal thought  and Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) are complex conditions that almost certainly arise from the influences of many interrelated factors.

(Source: Harvard Review of Psychiatry Journal)


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