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April 29, 2019 Monday 03:13:23 PM IST
Lithium Sulphur Batteries May Replace Lithium Ion Batteries in Future

Lithium Sulphur Batteries may replace Lithium Ion Batteries as the former has more energy density and use of graphene sponge makes the new technology viable.


Conventional Lithium Ion batteries available is capable of operating at only 300 watt-hours per kg to a maximum of 350. However, Lithium Sulphur batteries have a higher energy density of 1000-1500 watt-hours per kg. Conventional batteries have four parts -electrodes such as anode and cathode, an electrolyte that allows ions to pass between them and a separator that prevents contact between the two electrodes. The new technology entails combining the cathode and electrolyte into a single liquid called the 'catholyte'. The catholyte is filled with sulphur and excess amounts are soaked up by porous graphene gel.

The new technology will reduce the weight of batteries and at the same time increase the energy density of the it several times, according to lead researchers at Chalmers University of Technology.


Source: https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/Graphene_sponge_paves_the_way_for_future_batteries.aspx


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