Technology Inceptions: Caffeine to Boost Performance of Solar Cells  |  Teacher Insights: Diet-brain linkage   |  Teacher Insights: Rocking boosts sleep, memory  |  Science Innovations: New tech for infrared cameras   |  Science Innovations: Neuronal receptor’s cue   |  Policy Indications: School Students Can Effectively Use Social Media for Collaborative Learning  |  Technology Inceptions: Thermosets, the Most Widely Used Plastics May Be Made Recyclable  |  Parent Interventions: Food Additive Propionate May Increase Risk of Diabetes  |  Parent Interventions: Children Conceived After Short Duration of Marriage At Risk of Schizophrenia  |  Parent Interventions: Babbling Help Babies In Language Development  |  Technology Inceptions: Tissue Chips in Space Program To Help in Disease Research  |  Science Innovations: Aerospace material from polymer  |  Science Innovations: Way to boost drug potency  |  Teacher Insights: Short Rest Intervals Help May Improve Memory and Learning  |  Parent Interventions: Constipation In Children May be Caused by Difference in Sensory Processing  |  
  • Pallikkutam Magazine
  • Companion Magazine
  • Mentor
  • Smart Board
  • Pallikkutam Publications

March 23, 2019 Saturday 11:03:52 AM IST
Link in planet evolution

Astronomers have detected a 1.3 km radius body at the edge of the Solar System. ‘Edgeworth-Kuiper Belt Objects’ with radii from 1 km to several kilometers have been predicted to exist for more than 70 years. These objects acted as an important step in the planet formation process.

A research team led by Ko Arimatsu at the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan used a technique known as occultation: monitoring a large number of stars and watching for the shadow of an object passing in front of one of the stars. The team monitored approximately 2000 stars for a total of 60 hours.

Analyzing the data, the team found an event consistent with a star appearing to dim as it is occulted by a 1.3 km radius Edgeworth-Kuiper Belt Object. This detection indicates that there are numerous Edgeworth-Kuiper Belt Objects. This supports models where planetesimals first grow slowly into kilometer sized objects before runaway growth causes them to merge into planets.

Comments