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March 22, 2018 Thursday 10:48:44 AM IST

Know the Woman Who Stopped Nuclear Weapon Testing in Ocean

National Edu News

Today's Google Doodle is about Katsuko Saruhashi, a Japanese scientist, who performed exceptionally well in the field of Geochemistry. Katsuko was the one who discovered the impact of testing nuclear warheads in ocean. She proved that how dangerous it can be in the future, which lead to stopping the so called experiments under sea.

Saruhashi was the first woman to earn a doctorate in chemistry from the University of Tokyo in 1957. She is also the first woman to win the prestigious Geochemistry award. But the work that would define her scientific life was begun after the US started testing nuclear weapons at Bikini Atoll.  In response to that, the Japanese government wanted to know whether exploding the warheads was affecting the water in the ocean and in rainfall, and commissioned the Geochemical Laboratory, where she worked, to analyse that.

She explored the way nuclear fallout spread through the water. She found that the pollution was taking a long time to make its way through the ocean,  but that eventually, it would spread out and mix with the water, moving across the world. It was those findings and others like it that helped contribute towards stopping the test of nuclear warheads in the ocean.

When she retired in 1980, her colleagues gave her five million yen – and she used that money to establish the Association for the Bright Future of Women Scientists, which has rewarded Japanese women scientists working in the natural scientists with a prize every year since.


Google recognised all of those achievements in its Doodle, which was displayed across the world. "Today on her 98th birthday, we pay tribute to Dr. Katsuko Saruhashi for her incredible contributions to science, and for inspiring young scientists everywhere to succeed," it wrote on its page.


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