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May 15, 2018 Tuesday 05:17:56 PM IST
Just Wave Your Hand at the Technology!

Georgia: New technology created by a team of Georgia Tech researchers could make controlling text or other mobile applications as simple as "1-2-3."

Using acoustic chirps emitted from a ring and received by a wristband, like a smart watch, the system is able to recognize 22 different micro finger gestures that could be programmed to various commands -- including a T9 keyboard interface, a set of numbers, or application commands like playing or stopping music. The system can recognize hand poses using the 12 bones of the fingers and digits '1' through '10' in American Sign Language (ASL). 

Cheng Zhang, the Ph.D. student in the School of Interactive Computing who led the effort says that the system is also a preliminary step to being able to recognize ASL as a translator in the future.  Other techniques utilize cameras to recognize sign language, but that can be obtrusive and is unlikely to be carried everywhere. "If my wearable can translate it for me, that's the long-term goal," Zhang said.

The system is called FingerPing. Unlike other technology that requires the use of a glove or a more obtrusive wearable, this technique is limited to just a thumb ring and a watch. The ring produces acoustic chirps that travel through the hand and are picked up by receivers on the watch. There are specific patterns in which sound waves travel through structures, including the hand, that can be altered by the manner in which the hand is posed. Utilizing those poses, the wearer can achieve up to 22 pre-programmed commands.

Zhang said that the research is a proof of concept for a technique that could be expanded and improved upon in the future.

(Materials provided by Georgia Institute of Technology. )


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