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January 03, 2022 Monday 03:48:59 PM IST

It is never too late to Learn

Health Monitor

We are often told that it is impossible to learn a new skill during old age. Because of the misconception that the adult brain cannot absorb much information during later years of life, many people presume that they cannot learn something new.  The latest studies from psychology and neuroscience show that these extraordinary achievements need not be the exception. Although you may face some extra difficulties at 30, 50 – or 90 – your brain still has an astonishing ability to learn and master many new skills, whatever your age.

In a study conducted at the University of Zurich, it is observed that certain degenerative processes are reduced in the brains of academics. Their brains are better able to compensate for age-related cognitive and neural limitations. Senior citizens with an academic background showed a significantly lower increase in these typical signs of brain degeneration. In addition to that, academics also processed information faster and more accurately. It is also noted that brains that are active well into old age are less susceptible to degeneration processes.


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