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August 06, 2018 Monday 11:51:33 AM IST

Is the News Fake? WhatsApp on to pointing out the misleaders

Technology Inceptions

The government was informed by the WhatsApp team, the process of building a local team, including India's head, as part of steps to check fake news circulation but has not met the key demand of identifying message originators. They are building an India-based team, but the measures do not meet the government's expectations on 'traceability' and attribution of such messages.

The IT ministry, in its missive, had said that the platform cannot escape its responsibility for such rampant abuse and needed to find originators of provocative messages.

They are building an India-based team, but the measures do not meet the government's expectations on 'traceability' and attribution of such messages.


WhatsApp said it believes the challenge of mob violence requires government, civil society, and technology companies to work together. "It's why we've already made significant product changes to help slow the spread of misinformation and are working to educate people on how to spot fake news"

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