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October 24, 2017 Tuesday 03:48:19 PM IST

'Intellectual suit'developed by Chinese scientists

Science Innovations

Beijing: A group of Chinese scientists have developed an intellectual suit which are fitted with large-area textile sensors that can detect temperature, ph levels, pressure and other indicators showing the health status of a person.

At the third International Conference on Nanoenergy and Nanosystems in Beijing, Wang Zhonglin, an academician of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, introduced the invention, reports Xinhua news agency.

The suit, via wireless transmission, can send signals to a cellphone, a computer, or even to a doctor's computer a thousand miles away, so a person's health can be monitored anytime and anywhere, said Wang. The conference, organised by the Beijing Institute of Nanoenergy and Nanosystems, is one of the most influential in the field of nanoscience and energy. 

This year it focused on topics such as nanogenerators, self-powered sensors and systems, piezotronics, piezophototronics, energy storage and self-charging power systems. Over 700 scientists from more than 30 countries attended the conference that ended on Monday.


Wang also mentioned "nano tattoos". These stickers on the arm, which can be shaped as a pattern much like a tattoo, will be able to administer drugs into a patient's veins, providing a private and painless way of injection for diabetics. "Scientists have made prototypes of all these gadgets at the institute's technopark. They are expected to hit the market in two to three years," said Wang.

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