Life Inspirations: Ladies and Gentlemen!  |  Technology Inceptions: New Device Detects Decline in RBC Volume Causing Blurred Vision in Alcoholics  |  National Edu News: GATI, CURIE, WISTEMM, Vigyan Jyoti for attracting Women to Science & Tech  |  Rajagiri Round Table: Roadmap to Excellence in Research and Innovation  |  Policy Indications: Should Climate Change Communications be Emotional?  |  Science Innovations: Scientists Understand the Logistics of Protein Movement in a Cell  |  Health Monitor: Eating Disorders Linked to Psychiatric Disorders and Risk of Obesity  |  Science Innovations: The Mystery of the Flying Volcanic Ash Particles Revealed  |  Policy Indications: UK Graduate route to open to international students on 1 July 2021  |  Leadership Instincts: VP appeals to students to connect their knowledge with social relevance  |  Leadership Instincts: Catherine Dulac receives Nomis Distinguished Scientist and Scholar Award  |  Leadership Instincts: Online school reviews reflect school demographics more than effectiveness  |  Leadership Instincts: Researchers virtually open and read sealed historic letters  |  Cover Story: At Vantage Point  |  Management lessons: Why Aluminium Cans are Great for Packaging of Beverages?  |  
October 04, 2018 Thursday 11:53:35 AM IST

Insect-based food is truly tasty!

Health Monitor

Promoting insects as tasty, or even as a luxurious and exotic delicacy, could help to change attitudes and achieve more sustainable food production and healthier diets. This is the conclusion of a study published in the journal Frontiers in Nutrition.

Food production accounts for an enormous 25% of all human greenhouse gas emissions with livestock contributing hugely towards it. Hence it is important for researchers and policymakers to develop and promote more sustainable ways to produce animal protein.

One controversial option is farming and eating insects! In fact, insects have numerous health benefits as a source of protein and dramatically outperform conventional meats in terms of greenhouse gas emissions. An insect-based food might help in the fight against climate change!

Despite these benefits, people rarely eat insects and many people are wary or even disgusted at the thought of eating insect-based food.


The research suggests added benefits for portraying insect-based food as delicious, trendy or even luxurious, if they are to effectively change people's eating habits.

Source: https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fnut.2018.00088/full


Comments