Trending: Adaptive Leadership in Times of Crisis  |  Teacher Insights: 'Lab in a box' projects for home learning  |  Policy Indications: A global collaboration to move AI principles to practice  |  Science Innovations: Translating lost languages using machine learning  |  Science Innovations: Scientists develop ‘mini-brains’ to help robots recognise pain & to self-repair  |  Health Monitor: Ayurvedic Postnatal Care  |  Parent Interventions: Online learning ergonomics: Keep your child engaged and strain-free  |  Parent Interventions: Cow’s milk protein intolerance risk factors   |  Parent Interventions: Safe sports for kids during Covid-19  |  Parent Interventions: E-modules increase provider knowledge related to adverse childhood experiences  |  Technology Inceptions: ICMR validates ‘COVIRAP' by IIT Kharagpur   |  National Edu News: India progressing rapidly towards the goal of indigenously made Supercomputers  |  Best Practices: “Aditi Urja Sanch” Unit at CSIR-NCL, Pune  |  Reflections: What Really Matters  |  Teacher Insights: New Harvard Online course course prepares professionals for a data-driven world  |  
June 21, 2019 Friday 02:44:27 PM IST

Injectable tissues on anvil

Science Innovations

A simple injection that can help regrow damaged tissue has long been the dream of physicians and patients alike. A new study from researchers at University of British Columbia Okanagan campusmoves that dream closer to reality with a device that makes encapsulating cells much faster, cheaper and more effective.
Everything from broken bones to torn ligaments could benefit from this kind of approach; even whole organs could be repaired as the technology improves.Cells on their own are delicate and do not survive when injected directly into the body.To ensure cell survival, they need to be encased in a coating that protects them from physical damage and from the body's own immune system. 
Research in this area has been hampered by the cost and lack of availability of mass-produced cell encapsulated microgels. Now researchers have developed an equipment made up of readily available and inexpensive components that can produce thousands of cell-encapsulated microgels rapidly. This technology is expected to change the field of bio-engineering.

Comments