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April 20, 2018 Friday 11:33:34 AM IST

Independence Promotes Leadership Skills

Leadership Instincts

There are so many strategies that a teacher can adapt to instill leadership skills in students. One among them is to let them be free thinkers. It is one of the useful ways to help students become leaders.

It’s a common behavior problem for students to be dependent on their teachers for direction at all times. To break this cycle, teachers can define a few classroom rules that encourage students to solve problems themselves or in a group. One way to do this is to establish a routine such as “ask three before you ask me,” where which each student has to ask three peers the question before asking the teacher.

Another way to help students think and solve problems on their own is to teach essential social skills. Many students don’t have basic social skills, like learning to share and managing conflict. Instead of assuming that students have these skills, teachers need to help students build them, step by step. When students develop these skills early on, they’ll be more prepared to take problems into their own hands as they grow.

Since leadership can be taught in so many different ways, it’s important that teachers collaborate and discuss best practices. Teachers of different subjects can work together to teach similar leadership skills on an interdisciplinary level. When multiple teachers are committed to helping the same group of students develop these skills, they’ll also be able to help each other identify behavioral weaknesses and provide extra leadership support to students when needed.


(Source: planbook.com)


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