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October 21, 2019 Monday 11:15:33 AM IST

Impulsivity linked to disorders

Teacher Insights

Individuals with many different psychiatric disorders have a higher tendency to choose smaller, immediate rewards over larger, delayed rewards, a study led by Hamilton researchers has found. 

The findings of a meta-analysis by researchers of McMaster University and St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton, which combined data from more than 40 studies, was published in JAMA Psychiatry

That this type of decision-making tied to impulsivity, called delay discounting, is heightened in those with certain psychiatric disorders compared to others, is expected to have an important impact on future research and treatment across an array of disorders.
The study analyzed data from studies across eight different psychiatric disorders, including major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder, borderline personality disorder, schizophrenia, eating disorders, and others. The largest delay discounting effects were found to be associated with bipolar disorder, borderline personality disorder, and schizophrenia.


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