Teacher Insights: Chocolate, the Right Food to Improve Your Brain Power  |  Leadership Instincts: Strong Bricks Can Be Made from Bio solids and Clay  |  Parent Interventions: Order of Birth in Family Has Influence on Intelligence  |  Cover Story: MIND THE NET  |  Technology Inceptions: Oppo’s 10X Lossless Hybrid Zoom Smartphone Camera Tech to Enter Mass Production   |  Technology Inceptions: AI Can Help Improve Understanding of Earth Science  |  Cover Story: THE CYBER BRAIN  |  Science Innovations: New treatment for osteoporosis   |  Technology Inceptions: SpaceX Protests NASA Launch Contract Award  |  Science Innovations: Cost-efficient catalysts  |  Technology Inceptions: NASA to Launch New Space Telescope in 2023 to Explore Origins of Universe  |  Leadership Instincts: Social Media Cannot Cause Depression  |  Parent Interventions: Maternal Grandmothers Can Raise Survival Rate of Grandchildren  |  Teacher Insights: Waking Up Early No Guarantee for Success  |  Teacher Insights: Ask your girl child to do science, not become scientist  |  
  • Pallikkutam Magazine
  • Companion Magazine
  • Mentor
  • Smart Board

November 10, 2018 Saturday 11:05:09 AM IST
Ideas are contagious as disease

When it comes to the spread of ideas, do they flow from top to bottom or from big-name universities or less prestigious institutions? A recent study from the University of Colorado Boulder suggests that meritocracy does not always work in reality. The findings are published in the journal EPJ Data Science.

Study shows that it matters where an idea gets started. When mid-level ideas began at less prestigious schools, they tended to stall, not reaching the full network. The same wasn't true for so-so thinking from major universities.

"If you start a medium- or low-quality idea at a prestigious university, it goes much farther in the network and can infect more nodes than an idea starting at a less prestigious university," Morgan said.

The study also brings some good news: The bias toward big-name universities mattered a lot less for high-quality ideas. In other words, great thinking can still catch fire in academia, no matter where it comes from.

"I think it's heartwarming in a way," Morgan said. "We see that if you have a high-quality idea, and you're from the bottom of the hierarchy, you have as good a chance of sending that idea across the network, as if it came from the top."

Source: https://www.colorado.edu/today/2018/11/06/how-ideas-go-viral-academia

Comments