Technology Inceptions: Carbons Emissions Can Be Converted to Useful Products  |  Technology Inceptions: Huawei Nova 5i Pro Leaked Schematic Tips   |  National Edu News: IIT Madras Tops in NIRF 2019 Overall Rankings  |  National Edu News: Kerala Polytechnic allotment 2019  |  International Edu News: Queens University UK to Accept IIT JEE, Other Engg Entrance Scores  |  Science Innovations: New battery technology  |  Teacher Insights: OCD from feeling of responsibility  |  Higher Studies: Time to Apply for NIPHM PG Diploma in Plant Health Management  |  Finance: Policy Makers Should Give Top Priority for Wealth Creation : Dhiraj Nayyar  |  Rajagiri Round Table: Draft New Education Policy: Some Misconceptions and Major Recommendations  |  Science Innovations: Injectable tissues on anvil  |  Parent Interventions: Parental praise good for child  |  Technology Inceptions: Spotify testing ‘Car Thing’  |  Teacher Insights: Strategy to curtail junk food  |  Career News: UPSC Assistant Geologist 2019 Appointment list Released  |  
  • Pallikkutam Magazine
  • Companion Magazine
  • Mentor
  • Smart Board
  • Pallikkutam Publications

September 18, 2018 Tuesday 11:54:01 AM IST

Human brain is made flexible and forgiving

Parent Interventions

A new research led by psychologists at Yale University points to the flexibility of human brains, which explains why people judge transgressors with lenience and stay in abusive relationships for longer periods of time. The results of the study are published in the journal Nature Human Behaviour.

"The brain forms social impressions in a way that can enable forgiveness," said Yale psychologist Molly Crockett, senior author of the paper. "Because people sometimes behave badly by accident, we need to be able to update bad impressions that turn out to be mistaken. Otherwise, we might end relationships prematurely and miss out on the many benefits of social connection."

In another words, people tend to give benefits of doubt to the aggressors or to forgive them. “The human mind is built for maintaining social relationships, even when partners sometimes behave badly," concludes the research study.

Authors of the study hope that the research would help shed light on psychiatric disorders involving social difficulties, such as Borderline Personality Disorder. They have also developed new tools for measuring impression formation, which could help improve understanding of relational dysfunctions.


DOI: 10.1038/s41562-018-0425-1

Comments