Parent Interventions: Babbling Help Babies In Language Development  |  Technology Inceptions: Tissue Chips in Space Program To Help in Disease Research  |  Science Innovations: Aerospace material from polymer  |  Science Innovations: Way to boost drug potency  |  Teacher Insights: Short Rest Intervals Help May Improve Memory and Learning  |  Parent Interventions: Constipation In Children May be Caused by Difference in Sensory Processing  |  Teacher Insights: Sibling bullying more in large families  |  Teacher Insights: Low earnings related to inattention at KG   |  Science Innovations: Bio-alternative to plastics  |  Science Innovations: Horseshoe crabs relatedto spiders   |  Teacher Insights: Young Children Can Understand the Facial Gestures of Adults  |  Parent Interventions: Alarming Rise in Kids Swallowing Foreign Objects   |  Teacher Insights: Neurofeedback Training Can Improve Learning, Control of Body Movements  |  Parent Interventions: Sleep Myths May Lead to Poor Sleep Habits and Health  |  Cover Story: Building a Startup Ecosystem  |  
  • Pallikkutam Magazine
  • Companion Magazine
  • Mentor
  • Smart Board
  • Pallikkutam Publications

September 18, 2018 Tuesday 11:54:01 AM IST
Human brain is made flexible and forgiving

A new research led by psychologists at Yale University points to the flexibility of human brains, which explains why people judge transgressors with lenience and stay in abusive relationships for longer periods of time. The results of the study are published in the journal Nature Human Behaviour.

"The brain forms social impressions in a way that can enable forgiveness," said Yale psychologist Molly Crockett, senior author of the paper. "Because people sometimes behave badly by accident, we need to be able to update bad impressions that turn out to be mistaken. Otherwise, we might end relationships prematurely and miss out on the many benefits of social connection."

In another words, people tend to give benefits of doubt to the aggressors or to forgive them. “The human mind is built for maintaining social relationships, even when partners sometimes behave badly," concludes the research study.

Authors of the study hope that the research would help shed light on psychiatric disorders involving social difficulties, such as Borderline Personality Disorder. They have also developed new tools for measuring impression formation, which could help improve understanding of relational dysfunctions.

DOI: 10.1038/s41562-018-0425-1

Comments