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March 10, 2022 Thursday 01:02:33 PM IST

Hugging for Happiness

We hug others when we’re excited, happy, sad, or trying to comfort them. Hugging, it seems, is universally comforting. It makes us feel good. And it turns out that hugging is proven to make us healthier and happier. When a child is under stress before his/her exams, give them a hug. He/she is sure of getting relaxed. Scientists say that giving another person support through touch can reduce the stress of the person being comforted. Researchers of the University of Bristol have developed a huggable, cushion-like device that mechanically simulates breathing, and preliminary evidence suggests it could help reduce students’ pre-test anxiety.  They developed a new, touch-based device that could ease anxiety. Focus group testing identified the “breathing” cushion as being the most pleasant and calming, so the researchers further developed it into a larger, mechanical cushion. These findings suggest that the breathing cushion could be used to reduce anxiety, for example for students who are anticipating exams. Holding the breathing cushion, without any guidance, produced a similar effect on anxiety in students as a meditation practice.


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