Policy Indications: Madhya Pradesh Launches Startup Programme 2022  |  Cover Story: Elimination Round or Aptitude Test- How to Align CUET with NEP 2020 Goals  |  Art & Literature: Song of the Rain- Monsoon in Literature, Journalism and Films  |  Life Inspirations: Master of a Dog House  |  Education Information: Climate Predictions: Is it all a Piffle!  |  Best Practices: Project Manzil Inspires Young Girls to Seek Aspiring Careers  |  Leadership Instincts: Raj Mashruwala Establishes CfHE Vagbhata Chair in Medical Devices at IITH   |  Parent Interventions: 10 Tricks to Help You Prepare for This Year's IB Chemistry Test  |  National Edu News: TiHAN supports a Chair for Prof Srikanth Saripalli at IIT Hyderabad  |  Teacher Insights: How To Build Competitive Mindset in Children Without Stressing Them  |  Parent Interventions: What Books Children Must Read this Summer Vacation   |  Policy Indications: CUET Mandatory for Central Universities  |  Teacher Insights: Classroom Dialogue for a Better World  |  Rajagiri Round Table: Is Time Ripe for Entrepreneurial Universities in India?  |  Life Inspirations: How to Overcome Fear of Public Speaking  |  
February 03, 2020 Monday 12:09:55 PM IST

How to prevent food allergies by breastfeeding

Parent Interventions

According to new studies by researchers at The University of Western Australia, breastfeeding mothers may be encouraged to eat eggs to help prevent babies from developing an egg allergy. Study leader Professor Valerie Verhasselt, from UWA’s School of Molecular Sciences, said the findings were important because in western countries up to 10% of children already have a food allergy at one year of age.

“Our new study shows for the first time that this may also happen in humans. We’ve found that cases of egg allergy in children are four times less likely when they have been exposed to breastmilk containing egg protein, compared to those exposed to breastmilk without detectable egg protein.”

Targeting house dust mites allergens in breastmilk may be an additional key to ensure food allergy prevention in breastfed children. The team at UWA was also able to uncover that some mothers shed house dust mite allergens in breastmilk. House dust mite allergens are known to be responsible for respiratory allergies such as rhinitis and asthma.  

“By conducting pre-clinical experiments, we demonstrated the very new concept that respiratory allergens in a baby’s gut may represent a risk factor for food allergies,” Professor Verhasselt said.  “Targeting respiratory allergens may be essential for the prevention of egg allergy in breastfed children.”


(Source: http://www.news.uwa.edu.au/2020012011818/research/new-clues-understanding-how-prevent-food-allergies-breastfeeding)

 

 


Comments