Technology Inceptions: NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory back in action  |  Science Innovations: GenNext Solar Cells with Record-breaking efficiency invented  |  Science Innovations: Canadian researchers develop world’s fastest camera   |  Science Innovations: Scientists discover “ultra-stripped supernova”, the origin of gold and platinum   |  Parent Interventions: Why do bees stop buzzing during a total solar eclipse?   |  Parent Interventions: Lie detection is not an easy task  |  Teacher Insights: Can we learn while sleeping?  |  Teacher Insights: Sitting up straight boosts math performance  |  Science Innovations: Engineers design molecules that store thermal energy   |  Technology Inceptions: Russia May Bring Forward Manned Launch After Rocket Failure  |  Technology Inceptions: New Nokia Smartphone's India Launch Expected Today, how to Watch Live Stream  |  Science Innovations: Kahne Lab prepares to combat superbugs   |  Teacher Insights: False beliefs die hard  |  Science Innovations: New wayto convert metals to superconductors  |  Technology Inceptions: Willmott Dixon Trials 'Bionic' Vest  |  
  • Pallikkutam Magazine
  • Companion Magazine
  • Mentor
  • Smart Board

May 16, 2018 Wednesday 01:11:47 PM IST
How Moms Can Cultivate Positive Emotions

California: A new study by Cynthia Smith and Alise Stephens suggests that cultivating positive emotions may buffer moms from its impact on their parenting.

The study found that highly stressed moms of preschoolers were less likely to be sensitive toward their kids four years later—if they also demonstrated lower positive emotions during play. But high positive emotions seemed to mitigate this link: Among happier moms, stress and parental sensitivity were not related. This difference suggests that high positive emotions act as a protective buffer. 

Moreover, the levels of positive emotions kids showed with their moms were not associated with moms’ parenting sensitivity, which suggests that moms’ feelings were not merely a reflection of their children’s. 

“Positive emotions allow individuals to build up more resources over time,” write Smith and Stephens. “Despite reported feelings of stress, mothers who were higher in positive [emotions] may have been able to draw on these resource reserves when interacting with their children.” 

Although parenting stress may be ever-present, this research suggests that building up positive emotion reserves helps moms to support their kids without sacrificing their individual well-being.

(Source: journals.sagepub.com)


Comments