Science Innovations: "3D Epigenetics" Helps Understand How Genome Folding Influences Our Body  |  Technology Inceptions: India Creates History With Successful Launch of Chandrayan-2  |  Teacher Insights: Past Experiences Helps Human Brain Understand Present Experiences  |  Health Monitor: Diabetes Increases Risk of Heart Failure More in Women Than Men  |  Parent Interventions: Children With Autism More Likely to Be Bullied At Home and School  |  Parent Interventions: Napping child excels  |  Science Innovations: Wound-healing tool of plant cells   |  Technology Inceptions: Powerful Robots Helps in Faster Detection of Bridge Defects  |  Teacher Insights: Are you susceptible to persuasion?   |  Science Innovations: Mushrooms to help fight TB  |  Management lessons: How to Create Cool Brands and Stay Cool  |  Health Monitor: Honey Helps Increase Testosterone Levels in Males  |  Parent Interventions: Women Oncologists Skip Scientific Conference to Take Care of Children  |  Career News: Chinmaya University-CPPR Announce MA in Public Policy and Governance Course  |  Parent Interventions: Electrical zap to retrieve memory  |  
  • Pallikkutam Magazine
  • Companion Magazine
  • Mentor
  • Smart Board
  • Pallikkutam Publications

May 16, 2018 Wednesday 01:11:47 PM IST

How Moms Can Cultivate Positive Emotions

Parent Interventions

California: A new study by Cynthia Smith and Alise Stephens suggests that cultivating positive emotions may buffer moms from its impact on their parenting.

The study found that highly stressed moms of preschoolers were less likely to be sensitive toward their kids four years later—if they also demonstrated lower positive emotions during play. But high positive emotions seemed to mitigate this link: Among happier moms, stress and parental sensitivity were not related. This difference suggests that high positive emotions act as a protective buffer. 

Moreover, the levels of positive emotions kids showed with their moms were not associated with moms’ parenting sensitivity, which suggests that moms’ feelings were not merely a reflection of their children’s. 

“Positive emotions allow individuals to build up more resources over time,” write Smith and Stephens. “Despite reported feelings of stress, mothers who were higher in positive [emotions] may have been able to draw on these resource reserves when interacting with their children.” 


Although parenting stress may be ever-present, this research suggests that building up positive emotion reserves helps moms to support their kids without sacrificing their individual well-being.

(Source: journals.sagepub.com)


Comments