Technology Inceptions: Tesla to Start Delivering Model 3 to China Buyers in March  |  Technology Inceptions: ISRO Working on Chandrayaan-2 Launch for Next Month  |  Parent Interventions: Parents can influence kids' musical tastes  |  Parent Interventions: Discipline strategies to tackle misbehaviour  |  Science Innovations: New properties of sulphur atom   |  Science Innovations: Psychiatric diseases linked to molecular set-up  |  Cover Story: NURTURE AGRI-BUSINESS  |  Cover Story: A friend in weed Floating farms on weed islands   |  Rajagiri Round Table: Cultivate New Tech Farm Beckons Gen Next  |  Parent Interventions: Stronger Self-Regulation In Childhood to Boost Resilience  |  Parent Interventions: Youth with good relationships stand up against bullying  |  Technology Inceptions: Volvo & Skanska’s Electric Site Reduces Carbon Emissions By 98%  |  Technology Inceptions: ISRO Launches GSAT-7A Military Communications Satellite on Board GSLV-F11 Rocket  |  Cover Story: WHEN FOOD COMES CALLING  |  Cover Story: Yours Online, Kudumbashree  |  
  • Pallikkutam Magazine
  • Companion Magazine
  • Mentor
  • Smart Board

October 26, 2018 Friday 11:43:41 AM IST
How do schools develop support for students with ADHD

Researchers of the University of Exeter have developed the clearest guidance so far on how schools can best support children with ADHD to improve symptoms and maximize their academic outcomes.

In a study published in the journal, Review of Education, researchers of the University of Exeter have summarized a set of interventions which include one-to-one support and a focus on self-regulation improved academic outcomes of children affected by Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

Students affected by ADHD struggle to sit still, focus their attention and to control impulses much more than ordinary children of the same age. Schools can be a particularly challenging setting for these children, and their difficulty in waiting their turn or staying in their seat impacts peers and teachers. Research shows that medication is effective, but does not work for all children, and is not acceptable to some families.

Self- regulation is hard for children who are very impulsive and struggle to focus attention. Children need to learn to spot how they are feeling inside, to notice triggers and avoid them if possible, and to stop and think before responding. This is much harder for children with ADHD than most other children.

The study found that self-regulation delivered in one-to-one session is highly effective to improve academic outcomes of ADHD children.

The team also found daily report cards works better as well. Children are set daily targets which are reviewed via a card that the child carries between home and school and between lessons in school. Rewards are given for meeting targets. Report card method also encourages home-school collaboration and offers the flexibility to respond to a child's individual needs, the study found.

Children with ADHD are all unique and hence there is no one-size-fits-all solution. However, non-drug interventions in schools can support children to meet their potential in terms of academic and other outcomes, concludes the study.

Source: http://www.exeter.ac.uk/news/featurednews/title_687723_en.html

Comments