National Edu News: Specialised Training Required for Implementing ECCE: Dr Venita Kaul  |  Cover Story: Elimination Round or Aptitude Test- How to Align CUET with NEP 2020 Goals  |  Life Inspirations: Master of a Dog House  |  Education Information: Climate Predictions: Is it all a Piffle!  |  Leadership Instincts: Raj Mashruwala Establishes CfHE Vagbhata Chair in Medical Devices at IITH   |  Parent Interventions: What Books Children Must Read this Summer Vacation   |  Rajagiri Round Table: Is Time Ripe for Entrepreneurial Universities in India?  |  Life Inspirations: How to Overcome Fear of Public Speaking  |  Teacher Insights: Guided Play Effective for Children  |  Teacher Insights: Doing Calculations Boosts Mental Strength  |  Best Practices: Hugging for Happiness  |  Parent Interventions: Is Frequent Childcare Outside of the Family Beneficial for a Child's Development  |  Health Monitor: How to Measure Attention?  |  Life Inspirations: From BC to AC: What Has Changed in Pandemic and What Has Not  |  Guest Column: The Biting Army  |  
January 21, 2022 Friday 12:21:43 PM IST

How can we Revert Peanut Allergies in Children?

Parent Interventions

Peanuts are a common cause of serious allergic reactions. If you’re allergic to them, a tiny amount can trigger a major reaction. Even just touching peanuts can bring on a reaction for some people. Children are more likely than adults to have peanut allergies. While some grow out of it, others need to avoid peanuts for life.

A clinical trial funded by the National Institutes of Health, a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, has found that giving peanut oral immunotherapy to highly peanut-allergic children ages 1 to 3 years safely desensitized most of them to peanut and induced remission of peanut allergy in one-fifth. The immunotherapy consisted of a daily oral dose of peanut flour for 2.5 years. Remission was defined as being able to eat 5 grams of peanut protein, equivalent to 1.5 tablespoons of peanut butter, without having an allergic reaction six months after completing immunotherapy. The youngest children and those who started the trial with lower levels of peanut-specific antibodies were most likely to achieve remission.


Comments