Teacher Insights: Teacher Expectations Can Have Powerful Impact on Students Academic Achievement  |  Policy Indications: Make Sure the Digital Technology Works for Public Good  |  Teacher Insights: The Significance of Social Emotional Learning Curriculum in Schools  |  Health Monitor: Forgetting is a Form of Learning  |  Higher Studies: University of Manchester Invites Application for LLB and LLM Programmes   |  Health Monitor: Is There a Blue Spot Inside our Brain?  |  Parent Interventions: Babies born during the Pandemic Performs Lower during Developmental Screening  |  Policy Indications: Invest in Structural Steel R&D : Prof BS Murty  |  Management lessons: ONPASSIVE Technologies Shows the Way in Rewarding Outperformers  |  Parent Interventions: Can We Make Our Kids Smarter?  |  Health Monitor: More Sleep Means Better Quality of Life  |  Parent Interventions: New Year Resolution for Parents  |  Health Monitor: Health benefits of Choline in Kids  |  Health Monitor: It is never too late to Learn  |  Best Practices: IIT Hyderabad Improves ARIIA Ranking to 7  |  
July 24, 2019 Wednesday 01:33:34 PM IST

Hope to Arrest Muscle Decline

Science Innovations

Muscle decline caused by ageing and certain diseases could be dramatically slowed by stopping a chain reaction that damages cells, new research shows. The study revealed the previously unknown steps by which dysfunction of mitochondria - the so-called ‘powerhouses’ of cells - harms muscle health and leads to atrophy (wasting away). 


The research team, from the universities of Exeter and Nottingham (UK) and Tohoku University in Japan, showed that inhibiting various stages of this process suppressed muscle atrophy. The research was carried out on a species of worm called Caenorhabditis elegans - recently used in a muscle study on the International Space Station because their muscle cells resemble those of humans. 


Mitochondrial dysfunction is a key feature of several muscle diseases, but treatments are currently limited. Research shows that mitochondrial dysfunction causes calcium to build up in cells, which in turn activates enzymes that degrade collagen. Collagen is vital for giving structure to the outside of cells, so degradation of collagen destabilises muscle. 


Comments