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August 01, 2017 Tuesday 12:22:49 PM IST

Healthier Calves are Born to Cooler Cows

Science Innovations

Researchers have found that calves born to a mother that conceived in the winter compared with cows born to a mother that conceived in the summer have great differences. The calves conceived in cooler days produced greater milk fat and protein yield in comparison to those conceived in summer. The results are published in Journal of Dairy Science.

 

Researchers from Colorado State University and University of Florida, U.S. examined data from more than 150 herds of dairy cattle in Florida, where cows experience hot summers and mild winters to come to this conclusion.

 


“Our results showed that cows that arose from a pregnancy conceived in winter had, on average, better  survival, better reproduction, and greater milk production than cows  arising from a summertime pregnancy,”  said the lead author Pablo J. Pinedo.

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