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September 06, 2018 Thursday 03:36:05 PM IST

Happy seniors live longer!

Parent Interventions

Researchers at Duke-NUS Medical School in Singapore has shown that happiness in life is a crucial parameter that determines longevity of aged peopleand that an increase in happiness is directly proportional with a reduction in mortality. The results of the study are published inAge and Ageing, the scientific journal of the British Geriatrics Society.

"The findings indicate that even small increments in happiness may be beneficial to older people's longevity," explained Assistant Professor Rahul Malhotra, Head of Research at Duke-NUS' Centre for Ageing Research and Education and senior author of the paper. "Therefore individual-level activities as well as government policies and programs that maintain or improve happiness or psychological well-being may contribute to a longer life among older people."

The researchers also noted that the inverse relation between happiness and mortality is true, irrespective of age or gender differences: It hold true for men and women, the young-old and the old-old; all are likely to benefit from an increase in happiness.

Be happy and live longer!


Source:https://doi.org/10.1093/ageing/afy128

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