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March 01, 2019 Friday 11:17:53 AM IST
Half of all childhood cancer cases not diagnosed

Fifty percent of childhood cancer cases may go unreported or undiagnosed according to a new modelling study reported in The Lancet Oncology Journal.

The modelling study which estimates cases of cancer in 200 nations concludes that undiagnosed cases were more in South Central Asia, Africa and the Pacific Islands. The previous studies of childhood cancer were based on cancer registries that contained reported cases. However, 60% of the nations do not maintain cancer registries thereby impacting the accuracy of earlier studies. The present estimation is based on a micro-simulation model that also takes into account the epidemiological data. It estimates worldwide cancer incidence to rise to 6.7 million but actual reporting might be lower by 2.9 million for the period 2015-30.

The underreporting or undiagnosed cases could lead to inadequate government funding and investment in treatment facilities and research, according to Zachary Ward of Harvard T.H.Chan School of Public Health.

https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lanonc/article/PIIS1470-2045(18)30909-4/fulltext

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