Education Information: Degree College Teachers Training Programme from 22nd Nov to 12th Dec 2019  |  Career News: ANNOUNCEMENT FOR THE POST OF JOINT DIRECTOR, (NCERT)  |  National Edu News: UGC guidelines on plastic use  |  International Edu News: Asian students converge on 5 countries  |  Health Monitor: Playing With Fire  |  Finance: Trading in an Uncertain World   |  Technology Inceptions: Scientists are Wearing VR Goggles to Analyse Data  |  International Edu News: Macquarie University's Biofoundry to Set Up Synthetic Biology Center  |  Parent Interventions: Alcohol Consumption in Pregnancy Alters Babies' DNA  |  Technology Inceptions: EDantseva, app on Oral Health Released   |  Science Innovations: Two Physicists Win Nobel Prize for Discovery of Exoplanets  |  Science Innovations: Celebrate Diwali With Environment Friendly 'Green' Crackers  |  Personal Counseling: Learning Disorders  |  Creative Living: Born to be a Unicorn: Saga of d’Alembert  |  Rajagiri Round Table: Teaching in The Time of AI  |  
November 22, 2017 Wednesday 05:01:46 PM IST

Hackers stole data of 57 mn Uber users

Technology Inceptions

San Francisco: In a startling revelation, ride-hailing platform Uber has disclosed that two hackers "inappropriately accessed" in 2016 names, email addresses and phone numbers of 57 million customers and drivers, and the license numbers of around 600,000 drivers.

In a blog post on Wednesday, Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi revealed that the company has learned that in late 2016, it became aware that two individuals outside the company had inappropriately accessed user data stored on a third-party cloud-based service that it uses.

"The incident did not breach our corporate systems or infrastructure. However, the individuals were able to download files containing a significant amount of other information," he posted. The breach included the names and driver's license numbers of around 600,000 drivers in the US and some personal information of 57 million Uber users around the world.

"This information included names, email addresses and mobile phone numbers. Our outside forensics experts have not seen any indication that trip location history, credit card numbers, bank account numbers, Social Security numbers or dates of birth were downloaded," Khosrowshahi posted. At the time of the incident, Uber took immediate steps to secure the data and shut down further unauthorised access by the individuals.


"We subsequently identified the individuals and obtained assurances that the downloaded data had been destroyed. We also implemented security measures to restrict access to and strengthen controls on our cloud-based storage accounts," the Uber CEO said. According to Forbes, Uber reportedly paid a high fee to secure its data.

"You may be asking why we are just talking about this now, a year later. I had the same question, so I immediately asked for a thorough investigation of what happened and how we handled it," Khosrowshahi said.

Uber has asked Matt Olsen, former general counsel of the National Security Agency (NSA) and director of the National Counterterrorism Centre, to help the company how best to guide and structure its security teams and processes going forward.

"Effective today, two of the individuals who led the response to this incident are no longer with the company. We are individually notifying the drivers whose driver's license numbers were downloaded. 


"We are providing these drivers with free credit monitoring and identity theft protection," the Uber CEO noted. "While we have not seen evidence of fraud or misuse tied to the incident, we are monitoring the affected accounts and have flagged them for additional fraud protection," he added.

"None of this should have happened, and I will not make excuses for it. While I can't erase the past, I can commit on behalf of every Uber employee that we will learn from our mistakes," Khosrowshahi said.

Comments