Teacher Insights: Teacher Expectations Can Have Powerful Impact on Students Academic Achievement  |  Policy Indications: Make Sure the Digital Technology Works for Public Good  |  Teacher Insights: The Significance of Social Emotional Learning Curriculum in Schools  |  Health Monitor: Forgetting is a Form of Learning  |  Higher Studies: University of Manchester Invites Application for LLB and LLM Programmes   |  Health Monitor: Is There a Blue Spot Inside our Brain?  |  Parent Interventions: Babies born during the Pandemic Performs Lower during Developmental Screening  |  Policy Indications: Invest in Structural Steel R&D : Prof BS Murty  |  Management lessons: ONPASSIVE Technologies Shows the Way in Rewarding Outperformers  |  Parent Interventions: Can We Make Our Kids Smarter?  |  Health Monitor: More Sleep Means Better Quality of Life  |  Parent Interventions: New Year Resolution for Parents  |  Health Monitor: Health benefits of Choline in Kids  |  Health Monitor: It is never too late to Learn  |  Best Practices: IIT Hyderabad Improves ARIIA Ranking to 7  |  
May 03, 2019 Friday 03:11:49 PM IST

Green refrigeration material

Science Innovations

Researchers from the UK and Spain have identified an eco-friendly solid that could replace the inefficient and polluting gases used in most refrigerators and air conditioners. When put under pressure, plastic crystals of neopentylglycol (NPG) yield huge cooling effects - enough that they are competitive with conventional coolants. NPG is widely used in the synthesis of paints, polyesters, plasticisers and lubricants. NPG's molecules, composed of carbon, hydrogen and oxygen, are nearly spherical and interact with each other only weakly. Due to the nature of their chemical bonds, organic materials are easier to compress. In addition, the material is inexpensive, widely available and functions at close to room temperature. Details are published in the journal Nature Communications. The gases currently used in the vast majority of refrigerators and air conditioners - hydrofluorocarbons and hydrocarbons (HFCs and HCs) - are toxic and flammable. When they leak into the air, they also contribute to global warming. 

Comments