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April 16, 2020 Thursday 08:37:44 PM IST

Genetics linked to childhood emotional, social and psychiatric problems

Parent Interventions

University of Queensland scientists find that emotional, social and psychiatric problems in children and adolescents have been linked to higher levels of genetic vulnerability for adult depression. The scientists made the finding while analysing the genetic data of more than 42,000 children and adolescents from seven cohorts across Finland, the Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, and UK. Professor Christel Middeldorp said researchers have also found a link with a higher genetic vulnerability for insomnia, neuroticism, and body mass index. The results indicate there are shared genetic factors that affect a range of psychiatric and related traits across a person's lifespan.

Professor Christel Middeldorp said around 50 percent of children and adolescents with psychiatric problems, such as attention deficit hyper-activity disorder (ADHD), continue to experience mental disorders as adults and are at risk of disengaging with their school community among other social and emotional problems. "Our findings are important as they suggest this continuity between childhood and adult traits is partly explained by genetic risk," Professor Christel Middeldorp said.


(Content Courtesy: https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2020-04/uoq-glt041520.php)


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