Teacher Insights: Know about how to choose the best MPPSC coaching institute  |  National Edu News: Swinburne University of Technology & IIT H launch the joint doctoral program  |  Policy Indications: India & Japan collaborations for innovations on Hydrogen based technologies  |  National Edu News: Education Minister addresses at the Annual Convocation of IIM Rohtak  |  Education Information: UPSC postpones tests and Interviews of some examinations  |  National Edu News: Piyush Goyal launches the Startup India Seed Fund Scheme  |  Teacher Insights: Are you Proficient in English?  |  National Edu News: National climate vulnerability assessment sees 8 states as highly vulnerable  |  National Edu News: Education minister e-launches long-lasting hygiene product DuroKea Series  |  National Edu News: Punjab’s new nutrient rich crop varieties can satisfy India's nutritional needs   |  Guest Column: Delicious Dhabas  |  International Edu News: 2D Perovskites for Solar Cells and LEDS  |  International Edu News: AI Model for Predicting Tsunami  |  International Edu News: Wearable Sweat Sensors on a Bandage  |  International Edu News: Smallest High Resolution Microscope  |  
August 30, 2019 Friday 11:29:06 AM IST

Games to ward off memory loss

Parent Interventions

A new study has found that mentally stimulating activities such as using a computer, playing games, crafting and participating in social activities are linked to a lower risk or delay of age-related memory loss called mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and that the timing and number of these activities may also play a role. The study is published in the online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

There is strong evidence that MCI can be a precursor of dementia. There are currently no drugs that effectively treat mild cognitive impairment, dementia or Alzheimer's disease. Hence, there is growing interest in lifestyle factors that may help slow brain aging believed to contribute to thinking and memory problems, according to the study.

Engaging in social activities, like going to movies or going out with friends, or playing games, like doing crosswords or playing cards, in both middle-age and later life were associated with a 20-per cent lower risk of developing mild cognitive impairment.



Comments