Parent Interventions: Navigating through the Pandemic  |  Health Monitor: Attention and Memory Deficits in People Who Experienced Mild Covid  |  Parent Interventions: How can we Revert Peanut Allergies in Children?  |  Teacher Insights: Play Based Learning has a Positive Impact on Child's Learning and Development  |  Health Monitor: Social Media Use Likely to Affect the Physical Health of a Person  |  Parent Interventions: How to Deal with Developmental Language Disorder in Children  |  Health Monitor: Lifestyle Interventions from Early Childhood Prevents Cardiovascular Diseases  |  Teacher Insights: Teacher Expectations Can Have Powerful Impact on Students Academic Achievement  |  Policy Indications: Make Sure the Digital Technology Works for Public Good  |  Teacher Insights: The Significance of Social Emotional Learning Curriculum in Schools  |  Health Monitor: Forgetting is a Form of Learning  |  Higher Studies: University of Manchester Invites Application for LLB and LLM Programmes   |  Health Monitor: Is There a Blue Spot Inside our Brain?  |  Parent Interventions: Babies born during the Pandemic Performs Lower during Developmental Screening  |  Policy Indications: Invest in Structural Steel R&D : Prof BS Murty  |  
August 30, 2019 Friday 11:29:06 AM IST

Games to ward off memory loss

Parent Interventions

A new study has found that mentally stimulating activities such as using a computer, playing games, crafting and participating in social activities are linked to a lower risk or delay of age-related memory loss called mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and that the timing and number of these activities may also play a role. The study is published in the online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

There is strong evidence that MCI can be a precursor of dementia. There are currently no drugs that effectively treat mild cognitive impairment, dementia or Alzheimer's disease. Hence, there is growing interest in lifestyle factors that may help slow brain aging believed to contribute to thinking and memory problems, according to the study.

Engaging in social activities, like going to movies or going out with friends, or playing games, like doing crosswords or playing cards, in both middle-age and later life were associated with a 20-per cent lower risk of developing mild cognitive impairment.



Comments