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August 30, 2019 Friday 11:29:06 AM IST

Games to ward off memory loss

Parent Interventions

A new study has found that mentally stimulating activities such as using a computer, playing games, crafting and participating in social activities are linked to a lower risk or delay of age-related memory loss called mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and that the timing and number of these activities may also play a role. The study is published in the online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

There is strong evidence that MCI can be a precursor of dementia. There are currently no drugs that effectively treat mild cognitive impairment, dementia or Alzheimer's disease. Hence, there is growing interest in lifestyle factors that may help slow brain aging believed to contribute to thinking and memory problems, according to the study.

Engaging in social activities, like going to movies or going out with friends, or playing games, like doing crosswords or playing cards, in both middle-age and later life were associated with a 20-per cent lower risk of developing mild cognitive impairment.



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