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March 09, 2018 Friday 02:25:13 PM IST
Future Textbooks may have Chatbot Tutors

Imagine your text book starts asking questions to you while reading a chapter, or give answers to your doubts! Such a possibility is not far away. The technology to introduce chatbots inside online textbooks is so near.

IBM Watson Education gave such a demo recently. The programme, which they call 'intelligent tutoring system', amazed the audience with its performance. They showed off a seventh grade Physics Text with AI chatbot. 

Bryan Dempsey, Global Offering Manager for IBM Watson Education, pretended to be a student interacting with the online textbook, which was projected on a screen for the audience to watch.

The chatbot asked questions often. While Dempsey was giving incomplete answers, the chatbot encouraged him to make it complete. It even came up with fill-in-the-blank questions to keep him motivated. When he typed "I hate you!",  the system replied "Ouch! That hurts you know. Let's go back to my question."

The test programme received much appreciation. The company is working on the pilot projects as of now.

Inputs from: edsurge.com


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