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January 24, 2020 Friday 12:57:16 PM IST

Free research-backed games to train your brain

Teacher Insights

University professors from New York and California designed and developed three digital games to help its users’ brains work more efficiently. The games are available online and in the iOS and Google Play app stores. Evidenced through a series of research studies, these games may help users boost memory, inhibition, and cognitive flexibility, say the researchers.

 

“Can games actually have positive effects on players? We believe they can, and we designed three games to support learners in developing cognitive skills that researchers have identified as essential for success in daily life, executive functions,“ said Jan L. Plass, Paulette Goddard Professor of Digital Media and Learning Sciences at New York University’s Steinhardt School of Culture Education and Human Development and co-creator of the games.

 


Plass and his colleagues Bruce D. Homer of the Graduate Center, City University of New York and Richard E. Mayer of University of California, Santa Barbara – developed the games as a result of a 4-year research project funded by the U.S. Department of Education’s Institute of Education Sciences. The goal of the research was to design targeted computer games that improve cognitive skills such as executive functions like memory and inhibitory control. Upon discovering that the games successfully improved executive functions after as little play as two hours, the scholars wanted to make them available to the general public for free.


(Read more on: https://www.nyu.edu/about/news-publications/news/2020/january/train-your-brain.html


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