Health Monitor: Covid-19, First Case of Human Transmission to Animal  |  Leadership Instincts: Government launches an Empowered Group chaired by CEO NITI Aayog  |  Teacher Insights: KV Sangathan takes various steps for Online Teaching-Learning Process  |  Education Information: Not Sure of Reliability of News? Get It Verified at Covid19 Fact Check Unit  |  Science Innovations: Covid-19: DST funded startup develops chemical free silver based disinfectant   |  Technology Inceptions: A cost-effective virucidal coating of surgical masks from IIT Kanpur  |  Leadership Instincts: CSIR-IMTECH takes up sample testing for Covid-19  |  Creative Living: Music Industry Turns to Social Media To Bring Solace in Times of Pandemic  |  National Edu News: Hack the Crisis, Online Hackathon for Covid 19 Solutions  |  National Edu News: HRD Minister launches MHRD AICTE COVID-19 Student Helpline Portal   |  Science Innovations: University of Pittsburgh Covid-19 Vaccine Undergoes Animal Trials Successfully  |  Teacher Insights: UNICEF launches #ReadtheWorld initiative for children   |  Science Innovations: Covid-19 -Tracing the Route Map of the Clever Spiky Protein  |  Teacher Insights: Dr Christine Yao announced as BBC New Generation Thinker  |  International Edu News: New research on COVID-19's impact on youth mental health   |  
January 24, 2020 Friday 12:57:16 PM IST

Free research-backed games to train your brain

Teacher Insights

University professors from New York and California designed and developed three digital games to help its users’ brains work more efficiently. The games are available online and in the iOS and Google Play app stores. Evidenced through a series of research studies, these games may help users boost memory, inhibition, and cognitive flexibility, say the researchers.

 

“Can games actually have positive effects on players? We believe they can, and we designed three games to support learners in developing cognitive skills that researchers have identified as essential for success in daily life, executive functions,“ said Jan L. Plass, Paulette Goddard Professor of Digital Media and Learning Sciences at New York University’s Steinhardt School of Culture Education and Human Development and co-creator of the games.

 


Plass and his colleagues Bruce D. Homer of the Graduate Center, City University of New York and Richard E. Mayer of University of California, Santa Barbara – developed the games as a result of a 4-year research project funded by the U.S. Department of Education’s Institute of Education Sciences. The goal of the research was to design targeted computer games that improve cognitive skills such as executive functions like memory and inhibitory control. Upon discovering that the games successfully improved executive functions after as little play as two hours, the scholars wanted to make them available to the general public for free.


(Read more on: https://www.nyu.edu/about/news-publications/news/2020/january/train-your-brain.html


Comments