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August 22, 2019 Thursday 12:16:29 PM IST

For a stronger father-child relationship

Parent Interventions

Fathers who spend lots of time helping out with child care-related tasks are developing the best relationships with their children. There are two questions fathers of young children should ask themselves: What activities are best for bonding with my child, and when should those activities take place? New research from the University of Georgia reveals that both the type of involvement - caregiving versus play; and the timing - workday versus non-workday - have an impact on the quality of the early father-child relationship. Researchers worked with 80 father-child pairs when the children were about 3 years old. The team conducted interviews and observed father-child interaction in the home, shooting video that was evaluated off site.


The study published in the Journal of Family Psychology, reveals that fathers who choose to spend time with their children on non-workdays in pursuing activities that are child-centered, or fun for the child, set the tone for a good father-child relationship.


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