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March 18, 2019 Monday 12:11:51 PM IST

Food Allergy in Children Can be Prevented by Immunotherapy

Parent Interventions

Children suffering from food allergies may get a chance to eat their favourite food by oral immunotherapy, according to new research findings.

Scientists under the Consortium of Food Allergy Research (CoFAR) conducted a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study in which 55 children with egg allergy were given oral immunotherapy initially followed by egg-white powder. After two years they were subject further oral food challenge and consumed cooked egg and egg-white powder. After 24 months, about 28% of those who had immunotherapy did not show allergy to egg. These kids continued to be free from allergy even after 36th months when they consumed egg.

Some children are prone to chocolate, milk or egg allergy and most often parents avoid giving such food with good nutritive value. Now, parents may consider immunotherapy to gradually solve the allergy and help the child eat the food of its liking.


http://stm.sciencemag.org/content/4/146/146ec139.full?intcmp=trendmd-stm

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