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April 26, 2018 Thursday 03:20:51 PM IST

Five Children’s Books with the Best Leadership Lessons

Leadership Instincts

Francis Bacon, the 16th century author, has said, "Reading makes a full man". Though the new generation kids are not that acquainted with books, reading is a good habit that the parents can develop in their child at a very young age. It is a form of art, which can influence the child's thought process and attitudes. 

Here is the list of 5 books that can be helpful guides in moulding your child's leadership skills.

The Three Questions by Leo Tolstoy:

Illustrated and retold by Jon J. Muth, this book, published in 2002, will resonate with leaders in all industries. The New York Times reviewer called it “quietly life-changing.” A young lad is seeking answers to clear, pointed questions: “What is the right thing to do?” and “Who is the most important one?”


First the Egg:

This simple book from 2007 by Laura Vaccaro Seeger could work during a project work or a team work. The story forces people to think about what came first, the vision that leads to a new product, the lab mistake that leads to a new invention etc. It also shows lessons of transformation or the “playground of perception.”

The Lost Thing:

This magical tale published in 2000 by Australian author and illustrator Shaun Tan, encourages leaders to be generous; through generosity know that your team can come together. It tells of a boy who befriends a strange, humongous creature and kindly agrees to take him in. Eventually, they must wander through a bureaucratic terrain to find the Thing’s real home. The book grew into a short film that won an Academy Award in 2011.


The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore:

In this 2012 book by Wiliam Joyce, a man loves, nurtures, and repairs books. He follows a woman into an enchanted library where books are alive and gets to know them. As he ages, he decides to write his own story, which flies onto the shoulder of a young girl when it’s done. The lessons that fly out of this encourage managers to “foster good talent” and learn to leave a legacy of wisdom and sharing. 

The Tale I Told Sasha:

This story by Nancy Willard (1999) will work well for those who are struggling to be a leader. It follows a girl chasing her yellow ball through magical lands, over the Bridge of Butterflies and meets the King of Keys who the author writes “whistled twice ‘Believe! Believe!'” It reminds leaders to stay the course and believe in their vision. All good leaders need reminders to slow down, be generous, and remember their role within the institution.



How far books can influence a child's character formation?