Parent Interventions: Music improves communication skills of autistic children   |  Teacher Insights: Do you undergo ‘social jet lag’?  |  Parent Interventions: Social media could affect self-esteem of women  |  Technology Inceptions: Raspberry Pi 3 Model A+ With 512MB RAM, 5GHz Wi-Fi Connectivity Launched  |  Technology Inceptions: AMD Radeon RX 590 Mid-Range GPU Announced for Full-HD PC Gaming  |  Leadership Instincts: When ‘small changes’ better than ‘no change’ at all  |  Science Innovations: Alexa and Siri may in future learn language as kids do!  |  Teacher Insights: Ideas are contagious as disease  |  Science Innovations: Universe: Why is there something, instead of nothing?  |  Technology Inceptions: NASA's Hubble Telescope finds smiling face in space  |  Cover Story: HOME TRANSFORMERS FAMILIES WILL NEVER BE THE SAME  |  Cover Story: Thou shalt not discriminate  |  Rajagiri Round Table: FOR AN EQUAL SHARE OF THE PIE  |  Teacher Insights: People who breathe through their noses consolidate their memories better  |  Technology Inceptions: Driverless car technology may make traffic lights obsolete  |  
  • Pallikkutam Magazine
  • Companion Magazine
  • Mentor
  • Smart Board

August 03, 2018 Friday 01:49:33 PM IST
Fields Medal announced

Akshay Venkatesh, a renowned Indian-Australian mathematician, is one of the four winners of mathematics' prestigious Fields Medal, known as the Nobel Prize for mathematics. The award is handed out in a ceremony at Rio De Genero, Brazil in the International Congress of Mathematicans( ICM 2018).

The Fields medals are awarded every four years to the most promising mathematicians under the age of 40.

New Delhi-born Venkatesh, 36, who is currently teaching at Stanford University, has won the Fields Medal for his “profound contributions to an exceptionally broad range of subjects in mathematics.”

CaucherBirkar, a Cambridge University professor of Iranian Kurdish origin, Peter Scholze, a German teaching at the University of Bonn, AlessioFigalli, an Italian mathematician at ETH Zurich are the other winners.

Each winner receives a 15,000 Canadian-dollar cash prize. At least two, and preferably four people, are always honoured in the award ceremony.

The prize was inaugurated in 1932 at the request of Canadian mathematician John Charles Fields, who ran the 1924 Mathematics Congress in Toronto.

Comments