Parent Interventions: Headaches and online learning  |  Parent Interventions: E-cigarettes can be a ‘gateway’ to conventional cigarette smoking for teens   |  Parent Interventions: Thanksgiving meals for diabetic children  |  Technology Inceptions: Smart Speaker Determines Optimal Timing to Talk​  |  Teacher Insights: Teaching information literacy  |  Education Information: MISTI Global Seed Funds open for proposals after Covid pivot  |  Policy Indications: ‘Spill-over’ effects that improve the wider education system  |  Parent Interventions: Cambridge Dictionary names 'quarantine’ Word of the Year 2020   |  Policy Indications: Education Minister chairs a high-level review meeting on various schemes   |  Policy Indications: ‘Mitigation and Management of Covid-19: Practices from India’s States & UTs’  |  National Edu News: Cambridge University lauds National Education Policy of India  |  National Edu News: All Fixed to Mobile calls to be dialed with prefix ‘0’ from 15th January, 2021  |  National Edu News: Result of Combined Geo-Scientist (Main)Examination-2020  |  Policy Indications: Harvard Teacher Fellows provides new teachers, local impact  |  International Edu News: Oxford's COVID-19 vaccine offers a high level of protection  |  
August 03, 2018 Friday 01:49:33 PM IST

Fields Medal announced

Science Innovations

Akshay Venkatesh, a renowned Indian-Australian mathematician, is one of the four winners of mathematics' prestigious Fields Medal, known as the Nobel Prize for mathematics. The award is handed out in a ceremony at Rio De Genero, Brazil in the International Congress of Mathematicans( ICM 2018).

The Fields medals are awarded every four years to the most promising mathematicians under the age of 40.

New Delhi-born Venkatesh, 36, who is currently teaching at Stanford University, has won the Fields Medal for his “profound contributions to an exceptionally broad range of subjects in mathematics.”

CaucherBirkar, a Cambridge University professor of Iranian Kurdish origin, Peter Scholze, a German teaching at the University of Bonn, AlessioFigalli, an Italian mathematician at ETH Zurich are the other winners.


Each winner receives a 15,000 Canadian-dollar cash prize. At least two, and preferably four people, are always honoured in the award ceremony.

The prize was inaugurated in 1932 at the request of Canadian mathematician John Charles Fields, who ran the 1924 Mathematics Congress in Toronto.


Comments