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May 13, 2019 Monday 05:40:08 PM IST

Fictional Characters in Video Games Create Lasting Impact on our Brains

Teacher Insights

Playing fictional characters such Pokemon in childhood may create lasting impressions in the brain as it activates certain area of the brain, according to psychologists at Stanford University.


Eleven adults who took part in the study had played Pokemon extensively during their childhood. The game involves battles. When they were shown images of Pokemon, their brains responded much differently than those who hadn't played the game. The researchers reveal that an area behind the ears known as the occipitotemporal sulcus which usually respond to animal figures also respond to the Pokemon which are like animals.

The inference is that video games leave lasting impressions on our brain. Our brain is capable of holding many types of patterns and not just characters in the video game.


https://www.nature.com/articles/s41562-019-0592-8




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