Guest Column: The Psychotherapist with Fur and Four Legs!  |  Health Monitor: Dealing With Post Covid Syndrome  |  National Edu News: Secretary Higher Education urges students to emerge as job creators  |  National Edu News: PM addresses the 18th Convocation of Tezpur University, Assam  |  Leadership Instincts: Experts highlight the need for strengthening centre-state cooperation  |  Policy Indications: India’s global position rises both in innovations & publications  |  Education Information: Written Result of Indian Economic Service/Indian Statistical Service Examination  |  National Edu News: AstroSat’s Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope spots rare ultraviolet-bright stars  |  Parent Interventions: Randomized trials could help to return children safely to schools   |  Parent Interventions: How fellow students improve your own grades   |  Parent Interventions: School-made lunch 'better' for children  |  Teacher Insights: Second Anniversary of India Science, Nation’s OTT Channel  |  Leadership Instincts: Participation of MGIEP in the Implementation of NEP 2020  |  Teacher Insights: World of Puzzling Patterns  |  Education Information: HKUST Collaborates with Hang Lung to Foster Young Mathematics Talent  |  
January 09, 2020 Thursday 03:06:38 PM IST

Fibre Optic Cables as Seismic Network

Science Innovations

Placing seismometers under the sea is prohibitively expensive but an international team of scientists led by California Institute of Technology (CALTECH) has used fiber optic communications cables installed at the bottom of the North Sea to create a giant seismic network, tracking both earthquakes and ocean waves. The fact that the fiber network was able to detect and record a magnitude-8.2 earthquake near Fiji in August 2018 proves the ability of the technology to fill in some of the massive blind spots in the global seismic network, says Caltech graduate student Ethan Williams. Williams is the lead author of a study on the project that was published by Nature Communications on Dec. 18. "Fiber optic communications cables are growing more and more common on the sea floor. Rather than place a whole new device, we can tap into some of this fiber and start observing seismicity immediately," Williams says. The project relies on a technology called distributing acoustic sensing, or DAS. DAS was developed for energy exploration but has been repurposed for seismology. DAS sensors shoot a beam of light down a fiber optic cable.

Comments