Health Monitor: Equal Treatment  |  International Edu News: Autistic Children to benefit from new Digital Healthcare Apprentice Support   |  International Edu News: Professor Sir Michael Berry to receive Fudan-Zhongzhi Science Award  |  Policy Indications: Urban Areas Become Centres Of Biodiversity: Macquarie University  |  Parent Interventions: Study highlights failure to recognise risks of epilepsy drug in pregnancy  |  Parent Interventions: Teenage behaviour determines people’s health in later life  |  Parent Interventions: Housing wealth matters for children’s mental health  |  Teacher Insights: Teachers’ wellbeing largely unaffected by lockdown  |  Science Innovations: Covid-19: How machine learning can help to future-proof clinical trials  |  Leadership Instincts: Cambridge researcher named to Time 100 list of world's most influential people   |  International Edu News: Record state school admissions at Oxford  |  International Edu News: Oxford launches online consent programme for students  |  Leadership Instincts: Innovation Conversations; the Vice-Chancellor’s Innovation Awards 2020  |  Career News: Work Culture  |  Education Information: Department of Biotechnology launches a new programme  |  
December 20, 2017 Wednesday 04:27:58 PM IST

FB's device to block unwanted friend requests

Technology Inceptions

San Francisco: To prevent harassment on Facebook, the social media giant has introduced new tools that keep unwanted friend requests and messages from reaching you. The new features proactively recognise and help prevent unwanted contact when someone you blocked sets up a new account or tries to contact you from another account they control, said Antigone Davis, Global Head of Safety at Facebook said in a statement on Tuesday.

The new tools also provide the users the option to ignore a Messenger conversation and automatically move it out of their inbox, without having to block the sender. "Now, you can tap on a message to ignore the conversation. This disables notifications and moves the conversation from your inbox to your Filtered Messages folder," Davis said.

It enables the user to read messages in the conversation without the sender seeing if they have been read. "This feature is now available for one on one conversations and will soon be available broadly for group messages, too," Davis added.

Facebook hopes that the new tools will be of immense use for women and journalists who disproportionately experience harassment on the social media platform. As those who resort to harassment on social media often rely on fake accounts, Facebook said it is building on existing features that prevent fake and inauthentic accounts.


"These automated features help us identify fake accounts more quickly and block millions of them at registration every day," Davis said. But what happens when a new account created by someone who was previously blocked does not get caught by these features? 

"We are now using various signals (like an IP address) to help us proactively recognise this type of account and prevent its owner from sending a message or friend request to the person who blocked the original account," Davis said. 

"The person who blocked the original account is in control, and must initiate contact with the new account in order for them to interact normally," she added.


Comments