Leadership Instincts: UW launches Faculty Diversity Initiative  |  Parent Interventions: Participating in engagement schemes improves young people’s wellbeing  |  Teacher Insights: Foreign language learners should be exposed to slang in the classroom   |  Teacher Insights: Site announced for new specialist mathematics school   |  Parent Interventions: New research shows north-south divide in family law  |  Teacher Insights: Lancaster Castle provides focus for lecture on importance of heritage sites  |  Teacher Insights: Tactile books adapted for blind children  |  Parent Interventions: 'Sleep hygiene' should be integrated into epilepsy diagnosis & management   |  International Edu News: University of Birmingham signs up to global UN agreement   |  International Edu News: Credit card-sized soft pumps power wearable artificial muscles  |  Parent Interventions: High fructose diets could cause immune system damage  |  International Edu News: Submit short films to Bristol Science Film Festival 2021  |  International Edu News: Attachable Skin Monitors that Wick the Sweat Away​  |  Parent Interventions: Scientists model a peculiar type of breast cancer  |  International Edu News: NTU Singapore student start-up builds robots for pandemic-proof delivery  |  
October 16, 2019 Wednesday 12:30:07 PM IST

Failures Do Not Often Lead to Valuable Learning

Photo by Gerd Altman for Pixabay.com

It is often said that failures are stepping stones to success as you learn more from failures. However, in the case of corporates, it doesn't make sense to make failures as it leads to projects that create little if any actual value for the company, according to Jeanne Ross and Nils Fonstad, research scientists at the MIT Center for Information Systems Research. 
Instead of failing fast, companies should “learn fast” by designing initiatives to ensure learning, instead of hoping that failure leads to insight, Ross and Fonstad write. This type of thinking requires a cultural shift from organizational hierarchy to small, cross-functioning teams, and employees should be encouraged to test hypotheses by asking probing questions and admitting what they don’t know. “The challenge is to be much more purposeful about what you’re doing,” Fonstad said. 
Source: MIT Management/ https://mitsloan.mit.edu



Comments