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November 30, 2021 Tuesday 01:33:19 PM IST

Exposure to Deep Red Light improves Eyesight

A pioneering study led by Prof Glen Jeffrey of UCL Institute of Ophthalmology found out that one single exposure to long-wave deep red light in the morning can significantly improve declining vision, which is a major health and wellbeing issue, affecting millions of people globally. The study shows that daily three-minute exposure to long-wave deep red light 'switched on' energy-producing mitochondria cells in the human retina, helping boost naturally declining vision.

With the help of an LED device the participants were exposed to three minutes of 670nm deep red light in the morning between 8 am and 9 am. Their colour vision was then tested again three hours post-exposure. It was observed that using a simple LED device once a week recharges the energy system that has declined in the retina cells, rather like re-charging a battery.

In humans around 40 years old, cells in the eye's retina begin to age, and the pace of this ageing is caused, in part, when the cell's mitochondria, whose role is to produce energy (known as ATP) and boost cell function, also start to decline. In the near future, a once a week three-minute exposure to deep red light could be done while making a coffee, or on the commute listening to a favourite piece of music and such a simple addition could transform eye care and vision around the world.



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