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October 30, 2019 Wednesday 10:33:03 AM IST

Exercise good for aging brain

Teacher Insights

Exercise seems to endow a wealth of benefits, from the release of happiness-inducing hormones to higher physical fitness. New research shows it may provide a boost to the mind too.

University of Iowa researchers have found that a single bout of exercise improves cognitive functions and working memory in some older people. In experiments that included physical activity, brain scans, and working memory tests, the researchers found that participants experienced cognitive benefits and improved memory from a single exercise session. Before and after each exercise session, each participant underwent a brain scan and completed a memory test.In the brain scan, the researchers examined bursts of activity in regions known to be involved in the collection and sharing of memories.

Researchers found increased connectivity between the medial temporal (which surrounds the brain's memory centre, the hippocampus) and the parietal cortex and prefrontal cortex, two regions involved in cognition and memory. These individuals also performed better on the memory tests. 


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