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April 03, 2019 Wednesday 01:20:07 PM IST

Excessive Booze Slows Brain Growth in Adolescents and Youth

Parent Interventions

Excessive drinking may not only cause liver damage but also slowdown brain growth in adolescents and youth, according to a new research report.

The findings were based on experiments done on 71 rhesus monkeys that voluntarily consumed beverage alcohol. The brain growth was monitored through MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging.) It was found that chronic alcohol intoxication caused a fall in the growth rate of the brain, subcortical thalamus and cerebral white matter.

Alcohol consumption was already known to cause liver damage and now there is conclusive evidence that it causes brain damage too. Perhaps, this should dissuade more adolescents and youngsters from hitting the bottle. 


Source: http://www.eneuro.org/content/early/2019/04/01/ENEURO.0044-19.2019

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